Source: the publisher / TLC Book Tours

Review: Mystery Girl by David Gordon

Review: Mystery Girl by David Gordon

Isn’t the cover of this book fantastic? I love it. We’ve always been taught not to judge a book by its cover, but sometimes that is the main reason I decide to read (or not read, as the case may be) a particular book. That was the case with Mystery Girl. Yes, the premise sounded good, but when it was offered to me by TLC Book Tours I ultimately said yes because I love the cover. Heh. Now I find […]

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Review: The Panopticon by Jenni Fagan

Review: The Panopticon by Jenni Fagan

This book is so good. The Panopticon is written in first-person, narrated by a 15-year-old girl named Anais Hendricks. The story is set in Scotland and when it opens, Anais is being accused of beating a police officer into a coma and is being placed in an institution called the Panopticon. The rest of the story goes through Anais’s time in the Panopticon and the life circumstances/choices that have ultimately led to her being placed there. The subject matter doesn’t […]

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Review: Race Across the Sky by Derek Sherman

Review: Race Across the Sky by Derek Sherman

The back cover of Race Across the Sky asks, “Who would you run one hundred miles for?” My answer? Nobody. Let’s be realistic here: I’d never make it. I probably couldn’t even run two miles without hurting myself and/or passing out at this point in my life, and that’s not going to help anybody. I can think of a lot of things I would do and sacrifice for the people I love, but running one hundred miles is not any […]

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Review: In the Land of the Living by Austin Ratner

Review: In the Land of the Living by Austin Ratner

In the Land of the Living is a coming-of-age story, a family saga, a book about fathers and sons (and brothers), a story highlighting the differences and misunderstandings between generations. It also has a sins-of-the-father-being-visited-on-the-son undertone, in a way. It begins with the story of Isidore, which is told as a kind of epic myth about a hero: That there lived a man named Isidore Auberon, there can be no dispute. There is the reflex hammer with the reddish rubber […]

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Review: White Out by Michael W. Clune

Review: White Out by Michael W. Clune

I have always been interested in addiction: what causes it and how it affects people. Ever since reading Infinite Jest for the first time a couple of years ago, though, I have been much more aware of it and sympathetic to it on a personal level. I could read clinical studies of addiction and its causes and impacts, but what I’ve been choosing to read are personal accounts. Although most types of addiction have the same general properties and effects, […]

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Review: The Illusion of Separateness by Simon Van Booy

Review: The Illusion of Separateness by Simon Van Booy

Let me just start by saying that this is easily one of the best books I’ve read so far this year. The Illusion of Separateness gets top-five status on that list. It’s relatively short–I took two days to read it because I was savoring it, but I could have easily read it in a day–but it leaves a huge impact. The Illusion of Separateness is a book of interconnected vignettes (I think that’s the word I want) about a group […]

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Review: Drift by Jon McGoran

Review: Drift by Jon McGoran

Jon McGoran has been following and writing about food and agriculture for many years. In Drift, McGoran focuses on GMOs (genetically modified organisms). Technologies of this kind always have good and bad sides, divided by a fine ethical line. No matter how you look at it or where you read about it though, GMO technology often sounds like some kind of science fiction thriller. (Frankenstein, anyone? There is a reason why genetically modified foods have been nicknamed “Frankenfoods.”) Drift is a fast-paced […]

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Review: The Alley of Love and Yellow Jasmines by Shohreh Aghdashloo

Review: The Alley of Love and Yellow Jasmines by Shohreh Aghdashloo

The Alley of Love and Yellow Jasmines is Shohreh Aghdashloo’s memoir about growing up in Iran, having to leave her family and first husband behind in order to flee the country and pursue her acting career, and how her love for acting began and then evolved into the successful career she enjoys today. As a memoir, Aghdashloo’s story often feels disjointed; it doesn’t flow easily from one point to the next, and the transitions aren’t always smooth. However, I found […]

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Review: Sight Reading by Daphne Kalotay

Review: Sight Reading by Daphne Kalotay

I grew up in a musical household; my father plays the guitar, my mother loves the drums (though she doesn’t play), and there was always some kind of music playing in our house: jazz, classic rock, funk, some R&B and pop. I have always loved good music, which is probably one of the many reasons why I became a dancer. When I hear good music, I can’t help wanting to get up and dance. I also love the thought of […]

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Review: Immortal Bird by Doron Weber

Review: Immortal Bird by Doron Weber

Damon Weber was born with a congenital heart defect–his heart lacked the second ventricle that pumps old blood back into the lungs to be oxygenated. By the time he was four, he’d had two open-heart surgeries, the second of which seemed to completely alleviate his problem. At age twelve he was still a little slower (physically) than other kids his age, and his growth had been stunted as a side effect of his abnormal heart, but overall he was a […]

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