Genre: Fiction

Review: The Firebird by Susanna Kearsley

Review: The Firebird by Susanna Kearsley

Hang on to your hats and mark it on your calendars, folks: I gave four (out of five) stars to a Historical-Fiction-Paranormal-Romance novel. (See? I don’t even know what genre this book falls into because I don’t typically read/enjoy this type of book.) I was so pleasantly surprised with The Firebird, and that makes me happy. This is the first book I received as part of the She Reads Blog Network / Book Club, and I was so worried that […]

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Review: A Virtual Love by Andrew Blackman

Review: A Virtual Love by Andrew Blackman

I don’t have different personas online. I do have separate Twitter and Facebook accounts for this blog, but my Twitter account for the blog is only slightly more professional than my personal account. My social networking worlds collide all the time and I’m okay with that. What you see is what you get. I don’t feel the need to put on a different face for family, friends, and the other people I interact with on a daily basis. I’ve never […]

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Review: The Roving Tree by Elsie Augustave

Review: The Roving Tree by Elsie Augustave

Iris has always felt as though she has no true cultural identity. Given up for adoption by her mother, Iris is taken from Haiti at a young age to live with a white family in America. She doesn’t understand why her mother has given her up, she doesn’t know who her biological father is, nor does she understand the racism she encounters at school. As she gets older, there are many things about her past and her present that she […]

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Thoughts: One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest by Ken Kesey

Thoughts: One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest by Ken Kesey

The Combine is described by Chief Bromden as being the collection of institutions that raise children–and mold adults–to be the people society wants/expects them to be. For example: schools, workplaces, the military, psychiatric hospitals, etc. The Combine can also include, I think, parents, peers, and other non-institutional people. Someone must be in charge, but those people remain elusive (though we can make some pretty good guesses). Chief Bromden long ago recognized The Combine for what it is and decided not […]

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Review: Sight Reading by Daphne Kalotay

Review: Sight Reading by Daphne Kalotay

I grew up in a musical household; my father plays the guitar, my mother loves the drums (though she doesn’t play), and there was always some kind of music playing in our house: jazz, classic rock, funk, some R&B and pop. I have always loved good music, which is probably one of the many reasons why I became a dancer. When I hear good music, I can’t help wanting to get up and dance. I also love the thought of […]

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Review: The Black Country by Alex Grecian

Review: The Black Country by Alex Grecian

The Black Country is the second book in Alex Grecian’s Murder Squad series, and it is just as good as the first book (The Yard, which I read and reviewed last year). I am becoming very attached to Inspector Day, Dr. Kingsley, and Henry (Dr. Kingsley’s assistant). The banter between Inspector Day and Sergeant Hammersmith is even better than I remember it. While I really enjoyed The Yard and jumped at the chance to read and review The Black Country […]

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Review: Amity & Sorrow by Peggy Riley

Review: Amity & Sorrow by Peggy Riley

Via Dictionary.com: Amaranth: an imaginary, undying flower Amity: friendship; peaceful harmony Sorrow: distress caused by loss, affliction, disappointment, etc.; grief, sadness, or regret Amity and Sorrow are sisters who were born and raised on the compound of (their father) Zachariah’s polygamous, religious cult. Amity is twelve and Sorrow must be fifteen or sixteen (I don’t believe her actual age is ever given). They know nothing of the world outside the compound; they’ve never been taught to read or write; all […]

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Review: Deadly Harvest by Michael Stanley

Review: Deadly Harvest by Michael Stanley

  In Botswana, Africa, young girls are going missing after getting into cars with mysterious men. Detectives David “Kubu” Bengu and Samantha Khama have been charged with finding the girls…or finding out what has happened to them. Have they been abducted for sale as servants or sex slaves, or have they been murdered for muti–a traditional African medicine made by witch doctors, usually derived from plants and sometimes animals? Recent evidence suggests the latter, but it is almost impossible to […]

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Review: The Missing File by D.A. Mishani

Review: The Missing File by D.A. Mishani

The Missing File is a good, solid crime fiction novel. Told from two perspectives–that of Detective Avraham, and that of Zeev Avni–it not only provides a good mystery; it’s also a good portrayal of suburban life, proving that lots of things about suburban living are universal. I’m not sure that I like Detective Avraham, though. I don’t necessarily dislike him as a character, but he didn’t exactly win my heart over, either. He is portrayed as kind of incompetent concerning […]

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Review: The Orchardist by Amanda Coplin

Review: The Orchardist by Amanda Coplin

In 1857, when Talmadge was just nine years old, his mother took him and his sister to Washington after their father was killed in a mining accident in the Oregon Territory. In Washington, his mother started growing apples in a small orchard. Three years later, Talmadge’s mother died of a respiratory disease, and five years after that Talmadge’s sister disappeared in the surrounding woods and was never found. When Talmadge’s story opens in The Orchardist, he has been growing apples […]

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