Format: eBook

Review: The Campaign of the Century by Greg Mitchell

Review: The Campaign of the Century by Greg Mitchell

  Upton Sinclair was a lot of things: journalist, Socialist, muckraker, author, politician. He’s probably best known for his novel, The Jungle (1906), about the meatpacking industry in Chicago during the early 1900’s. That book led to the establishment of what would eventually become the Food and Drug Administration in 1930 (and to me becoming a vegetarian for four months in 2005 or 2006). These are all facts about Sinclair that I knew prior to learning about and reading Greg […]

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Review: Rage by Richard Bachman

Review: Rage by Richard Bachman

  [Trigger warning: gun violence, school violence] Rage is Stephen King’s third novel, published in 1977 under the pseudonym Richard Bachman. From what I understand, King started writing the book when he was only 19 years old, and while I’m sure there were changes made to the story and some serious editing done before it was published ten years later, it’s obvious that King is a born storyteller. I’m not sure I needed to add the trigger warning at the […]

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Review: Faitheist by Chris Stedman

Review: Faitheist by Chris Stedman

  In the Foreword to Faitheist, Eboo Patel–the founder and president of Interfaith Youth Core–says of Chris Stedman: His atheism doesn’t hate God; it loves people. He is proud of who he is (gay, atheist, Minnesotan, heavily tattooed, staff member at the Harvard Humanist Association, writer), and he wants to create a world where all people are free to be proud of who they are–Muslim, Jew, Hindu, Sikh, atheist, wanderer, whatever. He believes that the atheist movement ought to be […]

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Review: Salem’s Lot by Stephen King

Review: Salem’s Lot by Stephen King

  **This post has potential spoilers sprinkled all over the place, so if you haven’t read the book but plan to, you might want to come back later.** Yesterday I told you the story of my mother’s experience with ‘Salem’s Lot. It was because of her story that I didn’t pick this book up until a week ago. I read a few of Stephen King’s horror novels as a young teen, but never ‘Salem’s Lot. If my mother could be […]

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Review: Carrie by Stephen King

Review: Carrie by Stephen King

  This is Stephen King’s first novel, originally published in 1974. The book is about Carrie, a sixteen-year-old girl who is constantly ridiculed and put down by everyone around her, both at school and at home. On the day she gets her first period (which turns out to be an especially terrifying experience for her), Carrie discovers she has telekinetic powers, which have mostly been semi-latent until now. Very bad things happen. I read Carrie for the first time in […]

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Review: My Thoughts on The Passage and The Twelve by Justin Cronin

Review: My Thoughts on The Passage and The Twelve by Justin Cronin

Title: The Passage Author: Justin Cronin Format: Mass Market Paperback Length: 912 pages Genre(s): Fiction, Horror, Speculative Fiction Publisher: Ballantine Books – July 2012 Goodreads | Amazon From Amazon: An epic and gripping tale of catastrophe and survival, The Passage is the story of Amy–abandoned by her mother at the age of six, pursued and then imprisoned by the shadowy figures behind a government experiment of apocalyptic proportions. But Special Agent Brad Wolgast, the lawman sent to track her down, is […]

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My thoughts on The Magicians by Lev Grossman

My thoughts on The Magicians by Lev Grossman

I’m not even sure where to start, so I guess I’ll start by saying this: Overall, I am not impressed by this book. It’s a bad mash-up of Harry Potter and Narnia. It is neither “psychologically piercing” nor “dazzlingly inventive,” and I didn’t find it “enthralling.” I read this book for #1book140, and at the beginning of our foray into The Magicians the author stated that he wrote this book because he loves young-adult fantasy and wanted to write a […]

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Review: Zazen by Vanessa Veselka

Review: Zazen by Vanessa Veselka

Della is a paleontologist who lives with her brother and his wife, and who works as a waitress for a vegan restaurant. Since having a nervous breakdown, Della can’t stop hearing phantom bombs go off in her head and she can’t seem to shake off the depression caused by the environmental and cultural degradation going on wherever she looks. She spends her free time researching people who have used self-immolation as a form of protest, and she uses her education in […]

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Book Review: Let’s Pretend This Never Happened by Jenny Lawson

Book Review: Let’s Pretend This Never Happened by Jenny Lawson

  If you are not familiar with Jenny Lawson, aka The Bloggess, you are missing out. Jenny is witty, hilarious, sweet, giving, and definitely one of a kind. She’s just an all-around wonderful person. In Let’s Pretend This Never Happened, readers get more of the same hilarity that is found on her blog, and more importantly, some insight into how Jenny has come to be who she is today. Book summary from The Bloggess: When Jenny Lawson was little, all she […]

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Book Review: The Sense of an Ending by Julian Barnes

Book Review: The Sense of an Ending by Julian Barnes

  Winner of the 2011 Man Booker Prize Tony Webster is a typically pretentious and philosophical teenager attending a London prep school, when his history teacher asks of the class, “What is history?” Tony knowingly answers, “History is the lies of the victors,” to which the history teacher responds, “Well, as long as you remember that it is also the self-delusions of the defeated.” When asked the same question, Tony’s friend Adrian quotes Patrick Lagrange and answers, “‘History is that […]

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