June & July Reading Wrap-Ups and August Plans

June & July Reading Wrap-Ups and August Plans

This month you get two wrap-ups for the price of one. THAT’S RIGHT! At the end of July, when I was starting to put this post together, I realized that I never posted a wrap-up for June. Oops. This post will be formatted a bit differently than my other wrap-ups, to make room for two month’s worth of reading stats and a third month’s reading plans. WHEW. There’s no way I’m going into detail about everything that went on in […]

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Review: White Out by Michael W. Clune

Review: White Out by Michael W. Clune

I have always been interested in addiction: what causes it and how it affects people. Ever since reading Infinite Jest for the first time a couple of years ago, though, I have been much more aware of it and sympathetic to it on a personal level. I could read clinical studies of addiction and its causes and impacts, but what I’ve been choosing to read are personal accounts. Although most types of addiction have the same general properties and effects, […]

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Review: The Illusion of Separateness by Simon Van Booy

Review: The Illusion of Separateness by Simon Van Booy

Let me just start by saying that this is easily one of the best books I’ve read so far this year. The Illusion of Separateness gets top-five status on that list. It’s relatively short–I took two days to read it because I was savoring it, but I could have easily read it in a day–but it leaves a huge impact. The Illusion of Separateness is a book of interconnected vignettes (I think that’s the word I want) about a group […]

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Review: Drift by Jon McGoran

Review: Drift by Jon McGoran

Jon McGoran has been following and writing about food and agriculture for many years. In Drift, McGoran focuses on GMOs (genetically modified organisms). Technologies of this kind always have good and bad sides, divided by a fine ethical line. No matter how you look at it or where you read about it though, GMO technology often sounds like some kind of science fiction thriller. (Frankenstein, anyone? There is a reason why genetically modified foods have been nicknamed “Frankenfoods.”) Drift is a fast-paced […]

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Review: The Firebird by Susanna Kearsley

Review: The Firebird by Susanna Kearsley

Hang on to your hats and mark it on your calendars, folks: I gave four (out of five) stars to a Historical-Fiction-Paranormal-Romance novel. (See? I don’t even know what genre this book falls into because I don’t typically read/enjoy this type of book.) I was so pleasantly surprised with The Firebird, and that makes me happy. This is the first book I received as part of the She Reads Blog Network / Book Club, and I was so worried that […]

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Review: The Alley of Love and Yellow Jasmines by Shohreh Aghdashloo

Review: The Alley of Love and Yellow Jasmines by Shohreh Aghdashloo

The Alley of Love and Yellow Jasmines is Shohreh Aghdashloo’s memoir about growing up in Iran, having to leave her family and first husband behind in order to flee the country and pursue her acting career, and how her love for acting began and then evolved into the successful career she enjoys today. As a memoir, Aghdashloo’s story often feels disjointed; it doesn’t flow easily from one point to the next, and the transitions aren’t always smooth. However, I found […]

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Review: A Virtual Love by Andrew Blackman

Review: A Virtual Love by Andrew Blackman

I don’t have different personas online. I do have separate Twitter and Facebook accounts for this blog, but my Twitter account for the blog is only slightly more professional than my personal account. My social networking worlds collide all the time and I’m okay with that. What you see is what you get. I don’t feel the need to put on a different face for family, friends, and the other people I interact with on a daily basis. I’ve never […]

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Review: The Roving Tree by Elsie Augustave

Review: The Roving Tree by Elsie Augustave

Iris has always felt as though she has no true cultural identity. Given up for adoption by her mother, Iris is taken from Haiti at a young age to live with a white family in America. She doesn’t understand why her mother has given her up, she doesn’t know who her biological father is, nor does she understand the racism she encounters at school. As she gets older, there are many things about her past and her present that she […]

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Thoughts: One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest by Ken Kesey

Thoughts: One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest by Ken Kesey

The Combine is described by Chief Bromden as being the collection of institutions that raise children–and mold adults–to be the people society wants/expects them to be. For example: schools, workplaces, the military, psychiatric hospitals, etc. The Combine can also include, I think, parents, peers, and other non-institutional people. Someone must be in charge, but those people remain elusive (though we can make some pretty good guesses). Chief Bromden long ago recognized The Combine for what it is and decided not […]

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May 2013 Reading Wrap-Up and June Plans

May 2013 Reading Wrap-Up and June Plans

Hmmm…I don’t think I have anything even remotely exciting to share with you about what I did in May, aside from reading, of which I did a whole crap ton. Seriously. I look back on everything I read and wonder how I did it all. I am EFFICIENT, apparently. Ha! Finished in May: 23 YTD: 90 The Ecco Anthology of International Poetry, Ilya Kaminsky and Susan Harris (editors) Danse Macabre, Stephen King Frozen in Time, Mitchell Zuckoff The Roving Tree, Elsie Augustave […]

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