Guest post: Jamaal reviews Less Than Zero by Bret Easton Ellis

Guest post:  Jamaal reviews Less Than Zero by Bret Easton Ellis

  Sex, drugs and New Wave 80’s pop music:  each of these things has a dominating presence in Bret Easton Ellis’ debut book, Less Than Zero.  From the first page, Less Than Zero takes you on a whirlwind ride of detached teenage angst, loneliness and sexual debauchery.  While disturbing at times, it is an earnest, heartfelt look into the lives of the over-privileged. Less Than Zero is the story of Clay, born and raised in the glamorous city of Los […]

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Book Review: What the Night Knows by Dean Koontz

Book Review:  What the Night Knows by Dean Koontz

  When John Calvino was fourteen years old, his family was brutally murdered by a man named Alton Blackwood.  John’s family was the fourth set of victims in a string of awful murders committed by Blackwood, and John became the sole survivor only by killing the man who had so terrorized his family. Now, twenty years later and many miles away from where John lived as a boy, someone seems to be recreating the murders that Blackwood committed so long […]

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In honor of the phenomenal Maya Angelou…

In honor of the phenomenal Maya Angelou…

Today is the 83rd birthday of the wonderful, lovely Dr. Maya Angelou.  Born Marguerite Ann Johnson, she is a poet and author who is best known for her series of six memoirs that started with I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings, first published in 1969.  The first paragraph of her biography, taken from her official website says it best: Dr. Maya Angelou is one of the most renowned and influential voices of our time. Hailed as a global renaissance […]

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Book review: The World According to Garp by John Irving

Book review: The World According to Garp by John Irving

  Let me start by saying that The World According to Garp–first published in 1978 and the book for which John Irving won a National Book Award in 1980–now holds a spot on my list of favorite books, and Irving is quickly becoming one of my favorite authors.  He is an incredible storyteller; in my opinion, one of the best.  Speaking through Garp, Irving says, “…a writer’s job is to imagine everything so personally that the fiction is as vivid […]

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Breakfast & Books

Breakfast & Books

In my last Breakfast & Books post, I told you that I probably wouldn’t be writing another one for a while because I have so many books to read.  Eric and I didn’t even go to Barnes & Noble after breakfast last week, and we only stopped there today because Eric was looking for a specific magazine.  Well, I broke down and bought two books.  Actually, as Eric is also  interested in these particular books, it was more like a […]

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Book review: The Becoming: Safe House by Jessica Meigs

Book review: The Becoming: Safe House by Jessica Meigs

Safe House is the second book in Jessica Meigs’ series, The Becoming, about a nasty virus that is turning people into flesh-eating psychos (read: zombies).  And her zombies are kick-ass.  Gone is the slow-moving, shuffling, stumbling, seemingly idiotic, only-eats-flesh-it-can-out-muscle zombie.  Meigs’ flesh eaters are fast, intelligent, sneaky and calculating.  And it seems as though the majority of the population in the affected areas has been infected, so there are HORDES of these things.  THAT is terrifying. I plowed through this […]

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Breakfast & Books

Breakfast & Books

I skipped last week’s Breakfast & Books post because I had just ordered a bunch of books from Amazon and I vowed not to buy anything at Barnes & Noble… and I kept my vow.  Therefore, I really didn’t have anything to write about.  I almost skipped this week’s post, too, because now I have so many books on my TBR pile that it’s going to take me weeks to get through them all.  But alas, while at BN today, […]

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Book review: Neverwhere by Neil Gaiman

Book review:  Neverwhere by Neil Gaiman

I actually finished reading this last week, but it didn’t make a huge impact on me, so I’ve been putting a lot of thought into what I would like to say about it.  Let’s start with the stuff that I definitely liked about it… Neil Gaiman’s imagination is definitely one of a kind.  In Neverwhere, the people who “fall through the cracks” are homeless people and/or people who don’t necessarily fit in with society.  Their world is London Below, an […]

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Book review: The Autobiography of an Execution by David R. Dow

Book review: The Autobiography of an Execution by David R. Dow

  The death penalty is a touchy subject for most people.  If you have an opinion about capital punishment, as most people do, it’s likely you are not going to change that opinion any time soon.  I would also venture to say that most people’s reasons for opposing or supporting capital punishment are rooted in emotion.   While I can very easily discuss the economic, political and judicial reasons for not supporting the death penalty, the conversation will usually end up […]

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What should I read next? (Poll closed)

Hey, everyone! It’s time for me to start a new book, but my TBR pile is huge and I’m having a hard time deciding which book to read next.  I thought it would be a neat idea for my friends and readers to help me choose, so without further ado… The poll will be open through the weekend and I’ll let everyone know on Monday which book was chosen by the majority.  Thanks for voting! UPDATE: The poll is officially […]

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